Alumni

Lecturer and ASU alum Gary Cabirac to retire in June

While wandering Arizona State University’s campus in the late 1970s as a self-professed chemistry nerd, the young Gary Cabirac had no idea he would return and become a beloved lecturer in the School of Molecular Sciences. 

“I enjoyed being a student at ASU; there’s an energy level of being on campus,” Cabirac recalled. “Even back then, I recognized that the Department of Chemistry, as it was known then, was an island of excellence.”

Doctoral grad balances motherhood, teaching, research by prioritizing life, not work

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

Michelle Glerum loves teaching: teaching students and teaching future teachers.

Her goal is to create lessons that encourage students to think critically about world issues and help them compose sound and logical arguments.

Scientists study microorganisms on Earth to gain insight into life on other planets

In Oman, on the Persian Gulf, there is a large slab of ancient seafloor — including ultramafic rocks from Earth's upper mantle — called the Samail Ophiolite. These unique rocks not only provide valuable information about the ocean floor and Earth’s upper mantle, they may also hold clues to life on other planets.

Graduating history student reflects on times as an intern, research assistant

Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates.

Leah Arambula Terry was born and raised in central Phoenix, Arizona, to a dad who worked two jobs and a mom who took care of her sister, cousins and herself. She attended a prestigious high school and found the transition into a four-year university natural.

ASU students are instrumental in creating new imaging tool

After finals week her junior year at Arizona State University, Ana Staletovic received an interesting email from her physics professor, Bill Graves.

“The subject line was ‘Internship opportunity?’” Staletovic says. “And he said in the email, ‘You probably already have plans, but we are looking for a project manager intern.’”

Graves was offering her the chance to get involved with the creation of the world’s first compact X-ray free electron laser, or CXFEL for short, at ASU’s Biodesign Institute.

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