Faculty

ASU event to address human dignity and technoscience

Intersecting crises — the coronavirus pandemic, racial injustice and environmental catastrophes — have destabilized daily life and public institutions, rendering perennial questions about progress increasingly urgent. And yet, rethinking progress is not simply a question of what should be done through scientific or technological know-how; it is also a question of what it means to be human.

ASU research shows how deregulation could help minority businesses

If cities tweaked their regulations to make it easier to start a business, it might lead to more minority business ownership, according to an economist who analyzed a new Arizona State University dataset.

“I wanted to see, ‘Is there something we can put our finger on when it comes to the ease of doing business, and if we relax this barrier, will we see more minority business ownership?’ ” said Alicia Plemmons, an assistant professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.

ASU owl burrows get an upgrade

The burrowing owls on Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa had their living quarters upgraded recently.

When a class of about 20 students arrives to plant prickly pear cactuses near their burrows on a weekday afternoon, an owl appears in a burrow entrance shortly afterward, peering out to see what all the fuss is about. The owls aren’t shy. Tom Lyons, director of campus facilities management, sees them every morning when it’s cool.

ASU celebrates return of Homecoming festivities

A time-honored tradition at Arizona State University, Homecoming is back this fall after a pandemic pause, bringing together students, parents, alumni and the ASU community to celebrate their Sun Devil spirit.

The university will celebrate Homecoming this year with multiple events Oct. 24–30, culminating in a football game against Washington State at noon Oct. 30.

“During the seven days that mark Homecoming, students can expect a week full of celebrations on every campus,” said Sage Vu, student Homecoming director.

President of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to receive 2021 O’Connor Justice Prize

Judge Elizabeth Odio Benito, president of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, has been named the seventh recipient of the O’Connor Justice Prize. She was the first female professor at the University of Costa Rica Law School, founded the Human Rights Institute of Costa Rica and has served as the minister of justice of Costa Rica and as a judge on three international tribunals.

Astronomers provide 'field guide' to exoplanets known as hot Jupiters

By combining Hubble Space Telescope observations with theoretical models, a team of astronomers has gained insights into the chemical and physical makeup of a variety of exoplanets known as hot Jupiters. The findings provide a new and improved "field guide" for this group of planets and inform ideas about planet formation in general.

Hot Jupiters – giant gas planets that race around their host stars in extremely tight orbits – have become a little bit less mysterious thanks to a new study combining theoretical modeling with observations by the Hubble Space Telescope.

ASU Regents Professor receives prestigious award for excellence in aerosol research, technology

Arizona State University Regents Professor Peter Buseck is the 2021 recipient of the David Sinclair Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR), the leading international scientific research organization for the study of aerosols, with emphasis on atmospheric chemistry. This significant honor recognizes the sustained excellence of an active, established scientist who has made a lasting impact in aerosol research and technology throughout their career.

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