Black / African American

Toward equality in sports

Sociology and sports researcher Scott Brooks is no stranger to inequality. 

As early as high school, Brooks remembers seeing a few players get more opportunities to stand out on his youth basketball team. They would get more playing time, more support from the team and more chances to score, all of which led to a higher chance of a potential career in the sport. His coach would take players out of the game if players didn’t play according to his expected roles, and teammates would sanction other players who stepped out of line.

Attempts to diversify media, entertainment have stalled, panel says

Editor's note: This story is part of our coverage of a weeklong series of events to mark ASU's expansion in California at the ASU California Center in downtown Los Angeles.

When Ron Kellum graduated from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in 1987, he was one of two African Americans in the broadcasting program.

1st Black woman to pilot a US spacecraft lands new position at ASU

In 2021, at age 51, Sian Proctor became the first Black woman to pilot a spacecraft when she served on Inspiration4, a mission that marked several historic milestones for human space exploration.

Proctor was a member of the first all-civilian spaceflight to orbit Earth, flying farther than any human since the final Hubble mission in 2009.

The Crew Dragon capsule circumnavigated the Earth 47 times at the unfathomable speed of 17,500 miles per hour and at an altitude of 367 miles, higher than the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope.  

Social Cohesion Dialogue highlights diverse voices, topics

The Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Arizona State University presents the fall 2022 Social Cohesion Dialogue.

Since the spring of 2019, the Social Cohesion Dialogue has created memorable conversations and calls to action with accomplished writers and readers from diverse communities. Participants receive copies of that year's chosen books, free of charge, and then read the books and discuss them both in small groups and with the authors themselves at a special public event.

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