Faculty Honors and Awards

Regents' Professors

The title “Regents’ Professor” is the highest faculty honor awarded at Arizona State University. It is conferred on ASU faculty who have made pioneering contributions in their areas of expertise, who have achieved a sustained level of distinction, and who enjoy national and international recognition for these accomplishments.

Regents' Professors, 2010

Rachel G. Fuchs

Rachel G. Fuchs
School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Rachel G. Fuchs, is a Distinguished Foundation Professor and has standing as one of world’s most eminent social historians of modern France and Europe. Rachel Fuchs has achieved such distinction through the impact of her published works on the field of European History and through her very distinguished and effective leadership in her discipline. She is at the forefront in examining French and European history through the lens of women and children of the lowest social strata. This has been confirmed by the reception accorded to her canonical scholarship of Poor and Pregnant in Paris, and Contested Paternity. Her work has been awarded the Charles E. Smith Award, the Frances Richardson Keller-Sierra Prize for the best work in Women’s History, and the J. Russell Major Prize of the American Historical Association. Her work as a whole was the object of a Round Table Tribute at the 2010 meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies.

Professor Fuchs has had an enormous impact, not only in the field of French history, but far more broadly. She has been among the pioneers of women’s history, often the first to venture into particular areas of scholarship. She was the first scholar to take on the history of the poor in modern France; only her tireless research was able to reveal the face of the poor that largely had been buried under bureaucratic paperwork. A widely adopted textbook on gender and poverty in 19th-century Europe is a major synthesis of work in the field, as is her textbook on women’s history in 19th-century Europe, which she co-authored with her colleague Victoria Thompson.

Professor Fuchs' distinguished leadership in the field includes her service as president of the Society for French Historical Studies and president of the Pacific Coast branch of the American Historical Association. She has had a pivotal role in promoting European history and French history at ASU, including the creation of a state-wide association of historians of France, the French Historians of Arizona. Largely owing to Professor Fuchs' efforts, ASU’s history department is an important player in the discipline of French studies in the U.S. She is the recipient of three National Endowment for the Humanities awards and the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Professors. At ASU, she has been honored with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Faculty Award.

 

Devens Gust

Devens Gust
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Devens Gust, has set the foundations of much modern research on the mechanisms of light interaction with organic and biomolecules. His leadership in the field has built a foundation for large-group research studies to develop practical new technologies for harvesting solar energy to meet modern society’s needs. Professor Gust is internationally recognized for his pioneering work in photochemistry and artificial photosynthesis. His work with co-researchers Ana L. Moore and Thomas A. Moore has spurred massive international efforts aimed at designing new chemical approaches to absorbing and transforming solar energy into practical forms for storage and use. Their collaboration has become one of the most successful team efforts in science and engineering, garnering a reputation that is now legendary.

While they will long be remembered as a team, their individual efforts and contributions to the team are of notable importance. Professor Gust’s contributions stem from his expertise on the physical chemistry and spectroscopy of electron transfer processes in organic molecules and from his interest in pursuing related practical applications. Professor Gust’s research was based upon his deep understanding of optical spectroscopy and his ability to interpret how electrons behave in molecules that absorb light. His ability to experimentally probe and understand the functionality of organic molecules nicely complements the visionary design biochemistry of Professor Thomas A. Moore and the synthetic genius of Professor Ana L. Moore. He correlated the light absorbing behavior of molecules with their structures. With systematic experimental examination, this allowed the team to identify the essential structural and chemical components of a viable molecule for photosynthetic reactions.

These discoveries have led to cutting edge applications. As an example, such molecules can be used to power reactions in biomolecular systems to produce combustible fuels such as hydrogen and methane. Professor Gust was recently awarded, as principal investigator, an Energy Frontier Research Center grant to develop the Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production at ASU, which was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to accelerate these types of scientific advances in the area of renewable energy.

Professor Gust was recently named a fellow of such prestigious societies as the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the British Institute of Physics and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He has also received innovation and creativity awards from ASU, AzTE Technology Ventures and the National Science Foundation.

 

Sally L. Kitch

Sally L. Kitch
School of Social Transformation
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Sally L. Kitch is an international leader in the field of women and gender studies. All her work is profoundly interdisciplinary within a humanities tradition. She is known as a rigorous and creative theorist who uses feminist theory, legal theory and philosophy to grapple with the larger issues of race, class and gender. A distinguished scholar, dedicated teacher and a gifted leader in higher education, Professor Kitch’s pioneering scholarship has won the respect and recognition of scholars in many disciplines, including history, American studies, cultural anthropology and literary studies, as she has constructed thought-provoking, transdisciplinary analyses of the significance of gender in American and other cultures. Her rigorous and creative thinking about the construction of knowledge about gender makes her one of the leading figures in the intellectual formation of the interdisciplinary field of women and gender studies. Her book, This Strange Society of Women, has become a standard reference in the field.

With her expertise on race and gender, Professor Kitch has provided conceptual leadership for the School of Social Transformation and the Women and Gender Studies Program at ASU and for the Department of Women’s Studies at The Ohio State University. At ASU, she is also the founding director of the Institute for Humanities Research. In that role, she has been active in the Consortium for Humanities Centers and Instituties (CCHI). As co-chair of the CCHI’s steering committee on an international humanities and sustainability project, Professor Kitch works with more than 70 affiliate centers (in Australia, India, Taiwan, the United Kingdom and other European countries) to demonstrate and disseminate the exciting work of humanities centers and institutes on the topics related to the current environmental crisis.

As a result of her scholarly and administrative accomplishments, Professor Kitch has gained high visibility in the discipline of women and gender studies by publishing on the field’s development, consulting widely on graduate education, evaluating programs around the U.S., serving on committees in the National Women's Studies Association and the National Council for Research on Women, planning conferences and conducting workshops on a range of topics important to the growth and development of the field. In 2001, she organized the first national conference to discuss the advancement of doctoral programs in women's studies. Professor Kitch has received many awards for her scholarship, including the Faculty Achievement Award for Defining Edge Research in Social Science at Arizona State University in 2009.

 

Ana L. Moore

Ana L. Moore
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Ana L. Moore's extraordinary contributions in science stem from her genius for synthetic organic chemistry, exhibiting an ability to design complicated sequences of synthetic pathways that produce some of the most complex, but exquisitely functional, organic molecules. Much of her research career has been devoted to designing molecules that display essential features of naturally occurring photosynthetic molecules.

Her expertise has provided one of the essential foundations of a world-renowned program at ASU, along with team members Devens Gust and Thomas A. Moore, on artificial photosynthesis. This program has been devoted to simplifying the structure and design of molecules that can absorb light, temporarily store its energy in the molecule itself and eventually transform that energy efficiently into more practical forms. Her pioneering efforts, in concert with her team members, have helped spawn massive international efforts aimed at developing new chemical and biochemical methods to capture solar energy. She was one of the most prominent members of a team of 11 chemists to attract support for a highly coveted Energy Frontier Research Center from the Department of Energy for ASU.

Professor Moore’s contributions stem from her ability to fabricate molecules that the team collectively conceptualizes and designs. This is rarely a simple task in that the end product is generally controlled by an intricate sequence of steps. Often the procedures and sequence of steps that must be invented to achieve the desired molecule are, in themselves, significant scientific achievements. The success of the overall effort on artificial photosynthesis was dependent on her ability to synthesize these molecules so they could be analyzed for their photochemical properties and subsequently redesigned to improve the desired properties. This ability allowed the team to identify the essential structural and chemical components of viable molecules for photosynthetic reactions. Professor Moore has an uncanny ability to figure out the pathway needed. This has enabled the team to subsequently probe the functionality of electron transfer processes in photochemical and biochemically inspired reactions.

Professor Moore has been recognized for her work in many ways. She was named a visiting scientist at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris, and at the Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Systémes Polyphasés, Associé au Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Montpellier. The latter is one of the high-level research laboratories of France’s federal laboratory network. She also has been a major force in forming international research efforts between ASU and institutions in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Mexico and The Netherlands.

 

Thomas A. Moore

Thomas A. Moore
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Thomas A. Moore has made sustained and extraordinarily important contributions to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, ASU and the scientific community. Working with colleagues Devens Gust and Ana L. Moore, a vision was developed that has influenced the development of artificial photosynthesis and bioenergy as a pathway for developing practical new technologies for harvesting solar energy.

Professor Moore’s contributions stem from his expertise in photo-biochemical reactions and from his conceptual and facile understanding of how organic and biomolecules behave in reactions induced by light. He was able to combine complex, and sometimes disparate, observations and data to synthesize conceptual models of electron processes in molecules. His insight and experience led to major research funding on using light-activated molecules for powering reactions in biomolecular systems that produce combustible fuels, such as hydrogen, or electricity. As a result of his exemplary scientific leadership and expertise, Professor Moore is a founding member of the Center for the Study of Early Events in Photosynthesis, a Regents’ Center, which is now known as the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis, where he currently serves as director. He is a leader in ASU’s Energy Frontier Research Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production, which was recently established at ASU with substantial research funding from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Professor Moore is a senior ambassador of science, lecturing on the science and causes of global warming and providing assessments of ways to reverse deleterious trends. Scientists around the world frequently seek him out to discuss this broad subject and gain his insight. He has been named a visiting scientist on many occasions to prominent academic and research institutions in France and The Netherlands. Among these was an appointment as Chaire Internationale de Recherche Blaise Pascal, Région d’Ile-de-France; he has also held appointments at the Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette; and the Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Systémes Polyphasés, Associé au Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Montpellier. The CNRS is France’s highest-level network of national laboratories.

Professor Moore was recently elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, one of the premiere science societies of the world. With an extensive record of professional commitment, Professor Moore’s service to the field also includes roles as president of the Society for Photobiology; and as an expert on advisory panels for the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, the Catalysis for Sustainable Energy’s Helios Solar Energy Research Center (a joint research program between the Technical University of Denmark and the University of California, Berkeley), the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

 

V. Kerry Smith

V. Kerry Smith
Department of Economics
W. P. Carey School of Business

V. Kerry Smith is one of the leading environmental economists in the world. Smith has shaped the field of environmental and resource economics like no other. It was because of his work and that of a few other pioneers that the profession first came to realize that environmental problems can be viewed productively through an economic lens. The true scope of his contributions, simply put, pertains to the origins of the field, its current importance within economics and its influence on policy matters.

Professor Smith is best known as a pioneer in measuring the implicit value of environmental resources, the most fundamental concept in environmental economics. He has changed the approaches used in valuation in a number of ways. He has created techniques that involve applied general equilibrium analysis. The use of meta-analysis for evaluating the consistency in hedonic property value measures for air quality was introduced by Professor Smith. His work on option pricing and uncertainty adds another important dimension in this line of research. Professor Smith was the first to incorporate spatial considerations into a general equilibrium model. One cannot study environmental economics without fully confronting all of these studies. His recent election as a member of the National Academy of Sciences is testimony to his influence. He is one of only four environmental economists inducted into the Academy.

Professor Smith’s work has profoundly influenced government policy as well as the academic literature. Through his extensive service, Professor Smith has been described as a global ambassador for the field of environmental economics. In addition to the National Academy of Science, he has enjoyed high-level involvement in the prestigious National Bureau of Economic Research; was instrumental in setting up the Association of Environmental and Resource Economics; served on many advisory boards, including boards for the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Research Council; and is a University Fellow at Resources for the Future. Professor Smith has been recognized for his outstanding contributions to the field of environmental economics with an appointment as a Fellow in the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in 2005, the ASU Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Defining Edge Research in 2008, and the W. P. Carey School of Business Award for Research in 2009.

 

Previous Awardees